Doctors and researchers increasingly recognize that caring for people with dementia compromises the physical and mental health of the caregivers.  That, in turn, jeopardizes the well-being of the people they are caring for.  Some studies have shown that the burden on caregivers may increase the likelihood that the loved ones in their charge will be placed in a nursing home. “People with Alzheimer’s who have stressed caregivers have been shown to have poor outcomes,” said Zaldy Tan, the medical director of the UCLA Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Program who created the boot camp. “Their caregivers have essentially thrown in the towel.” People with dementia are also more likely to go to the emergency room and be hospitalized if their caregivers aren’t prepared for the job, Tan said.  That is one of the main reasons why UCLA Health and its geriatrics division started its caregiver boot camps in 2015.

UCLA holds four boot camps a year at community and senior centers around Southern California and hopes to expand over the next year to meet the growing need. About 5 million Americans, 1 in 10 people over 65, have Alzheimer’s disease — a number that could balloon to 16 million by 2050, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. You can read more about the caregiver boot camp at the below link.

Kaiser Health News

Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditDigg thisShare on StumbleUponBuffer this pageShare on TumblrEmail this to someone
About Jerry

Jerold E. Rothkoff, a practicing New Jersey and Pennsylvania attorney, is the Principal of the Rothkoff Law Group, an elder care law firm. Jerry dedicates his practice to serving clients in the areas of life care planning, long-term care planning, Medicaid & VA benefits, and advocacy for the elderly and disabled. He is past President of the NJ Chapter of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, former chair of the elder law section of the NJ State Bar Association, and past President of the Life Care Planning Law Firm Association. Jerry continues to be an outspoken advocate for the rights of the elderly and disabled. He writes for and gives presentations regularly to attorneys and other professionals about legal issues related to seniors and those with disabilities. Jerry’s community activities include the Twilight Wish Foundation, the Delaware Valley Stroke Council, the Alzheimer’s Association, as well as numerous other advocacy groups. When not in the office, Jerry spends time with his wife, Erica, and their five children, eighteen-year old identical twin girls, Liza and Julia, fifteen-year old fraternal twin boys, Evan and Gregory, and six-year old Aitan.

Leave a Reply